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Former Residence of Sun Yat-Sen

Add:7 Xiangshan Rd, near Sinan Rd.

Tel:021-5465 9050

Time:9am-4:30pm

Website:http://www.sh-sunyat-sen.org

English Service Available

2013-01-30

Sun Yat-sen (1866-1925), known as the “Father of the Republic,” holds a special place in the Chinese history. He led the 1911 Revolution which overthrew the Qing Dynasty, the last imperial dynasty of China, and became the provisional president of the Republic of China.

Sun was born in Guangdong Province, obtained education in Hawaii and practiced medicine in Macao and Guangzhou before devoting himself to politics.

Sun Yat-sen’s Former Residence, covering an area of more than 2,000 square meters, is one of Shanghai’s important historical sites. The visit begins with the Sun Yat-sen Museum, a nearby Western-style building that displays 300 or so cultural relics and related materials. Its exhibition traces the life of Sun Yat-sen from his youth to his political activities. A video room on the second floor shows a documentary, Get Close to Sun Yat-sen. Since most manuscripts were in Chinese, it's better to ask for a guide’s help to understand their meanings. 

The residence is a two-storey European-style building. The study and the sitting room are the main features of the building, arranged as they were in the 1920s and 1930s. In the sitting room where many politicians once met, three white sofas are placed near the fireplace, inviting people’s imagination. A part of Sun Yat-sen’s collection of books is kept in a dark wooden bookcase in the corridor leading to the staircase. In the back of the house is a small, quiet garden.

Sun Yat-sen and his wife Soong Ching-Ling moved to this house in June 1918. Banished from the power in 1912, Sun carried out political activities in this house, turning it into a virtual "ministry" between June 1918 and November 1924. After he died in 1925, Soong Ching-Ling continued to live here until the outbreak of the War against Japanese Aggressors in 1937.

English and Japanese-speaking guides are free by appointment.

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